Andrea Stanislav

Press

Article by Mary Abbe, “Sizzle & Fizzle: Minneapolis College of Art and Design showcases new work by four winners of McKnight Fellowships,” (photos), July 15, 2011, E16 (Star Tribune).

sizzle and fizzle tribune thumb

read pdf

 

Catalog of the 2010-2011 McKnight Artists Fellowship for Visual Arts, McKnight Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, essay by Dan Byers, Curator Carnegie Museum of Art, 2011

mcad thumb

read pdf

 

mnartist.org, February 16, 2010
Author: Corina Kirsch

read pdf

excerpts from the article:

The works in this exhibition resist a clear orientation with either sculpture or painting; instead, almost all the pieces are constructed through a multi-step process, involving an image or text printed onto a two dimensional surface, which is then covered with pink or gray glitter; finally the contents are sealed in with a clear polymer veneer. Equally seductive and repulsive in their campiness, Stanislav's works consist of so many pop culture references; taken together, the cryptic bits of text are like a crib sheet for a course on post-1960s rock music and film -- see Pressure Drop (2009); Bohemian Atmosphere (Performance) (2009); and Change Will Do You Good (Gang of Four) (2009).
Are these merely insiders' jokes, feigned hipness, or an attempt to capture something of the late-20th century's zeitgeist? Whatever their individual denotations, Stanislav's appropriations also double as inauthentic markers of a past era, suitably trapped under an airtess, plastic veneer...
In the artist's current solo exhibition at the Burnet Art Gallery in Chambers Hotel, Lightning Struck Itself (her second in this space), the impossible, in particular, manifests itself in her work through the impotence of visual and text-based communication. Simply trying to see the images or read the text embedded in her glittery, bright, and shiny surfaces is like wrestling with an enigma, as her images fade and flicker under the gallery's light.
Understood that way, language takes on an immeasurable immensity much like, say, the concept of a River to Infinity. However, this torrent of possible associations quickly regresses to a never-ending absurdity. Stanislav's vertically oriented works, her "Zagadkas," Zagadka (the riddle), Zagadka (pink), Zagadka III, while lacking any textual references on their surfaces, recall the monoliths that populate 2001: A Space Odyssey, or Barnett Newmann's "zips." Again, language is slippery and filled with ciphers, haunted both by ghosts of art history and of culture's past. As inclusive as art has become, allowing any range of topoi, it has also become more hermetic, a closed system of endless associations. Stanislav's texts, sealed underneath hardened plastic and trapped in a landscape of undulating glitter, confronts this inescapable conundrum of language. The plurality of meanings, and our inability to control them all, leaves us empty. In the end, we are alone, even while surrounded with all the words in the world.

 

Art Papers, May/June 2008
Author: Christopher Atkins

Read pdf

excerpts from the article:

While Stanislav had worked with cosmograms, mirrors, and continental maps before, she had never combined them in a single piece. On opposite walls of the same gallery, she installed two massive mirrored astrological charts: Portrait I, 2008, represents the first Continental Congress of 1774; Portrait II, 2008, the dates of provocations that have led to America's major wars. These aren't maps or portraits per se, but they are reminders that all beginnings require a rupture. What's more, Stanislav's combination of lo-fi special effects with astrological forecasting endows events with a kind of cultural personality. Looking into the abyss of images that recede into the past while they also stretch into the future, we see that the infinite reproductions are not exact likenesses. Yet, we also know that hostilities have a way of repeating themselves.
The adjacent gallery presents the landscape and one-point perspective as important tools of empire by way of twin video projections and floor and ceiling mounted mirrors. For her video River to Infinity-The Vanishing Points, 2008, Stanislav staged nine mirrored obelisks in the Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah-like gems on jeweler's velvet-and a perfectly timed, dynamite and gasoline fireball explosion that reduces them to rubble with beautiful creative and violent force. Close-ups of an owl and a mirror-eyed seer come into the mix, invoking mythological figures with extrasensory foretelling powers. Once the dust settles, Stanislav conjures lo-fi camera magic to reverse the diegetic destruction and bring the obelisks back to wholeness. Her rewind-repeat trick isn't an elaborate and seductive illusion. But it asks us to witness the explosion over and over again, which produces a resurrection of sorts. There is no opportunity to restart and avoid the inevitable, however;we merely return to the beginning of a story that will repeat endlessly.
The cycle of life and death echoes throughout the work, which is caught in reiteration; it is the realm of circles, loops, rotations, orbits and abysses. Still, despite its forays into visual culture, the work makes little effort to convince us to believe in any specific model of time. It simply reveals, aestheticizes, and critiques the conceptions of repetition and return that operate, to varying degrees, in all theologies, ideologies, and historiographies.
-Christopher Atkins

 

River to Infinity -- the Vanishing Points brochure
Essay: Jan Garden Castro


Read pdf

excerpts from the essay:

Stanislav gives new teeth to the allegories of Cocteau and Plato. She uses the river—the symbol of Westward expansion, and the vanishing point—the illusion that two parallel lines meet somewhere in the far distance—as potent metaphors illustrating today’s quandary: outside of our sanitized and romanticized big-screen versions of vanishing species, we’re literally destroying the wilderness and the natives we profess to respect. Stanislav uses these images to remind us of the nineteenthcentury notion of “Manifest Destiny,”—begun in the 1840s to justify turning the western territories into states, revived in 1890s to justify U.S. military support, interventions, and invasions beyond U.S. borders, and continuing today in Afghanistan, Iraq, and various military bases around the world...
Stanislav’s body of work has multiple correspondences with aesthetic theory, the sciences, and humanities, starting with Jean Baudrillard, the French cultural theorist who was fascinated with America’s quest to achieve Utopia. His notion of “Simulacra and Simulation,” inspired by a Jorge Luis Borges story, posits that sometimes the map is not just a double or a mirror of the territory—but precedes it. In Stanislav’s version of this, the salt flats mirrored in the obelisks and in the video are more real than the desert alone. Without these interventions, viewers would never see these salt flats at this moment in time. What’s more, the real desert scene involved vehicles, equipment, a pyrotechnic expert, our artist/director, and her crew. The video does not literally picture this yet figuratively embodies the physical acts leading to the digital images. Stanislav wants viewers to be seduced by her exploding metaphor and, at the same time, to wake up to the falsehood of the myriad illusions in our daily lives...

 

NY ARTS, January/February 2007
Cover story/article: Amanda M. Vail

read pdf

excerpts from the article:

"Quantum Circus" is a sculptural environment; the artworks cannot be separated from each other and retain the same meaning. Patterns emerge as time is spent in the gallery absorbing the atmosphere, listening to the mild cacophony, watching the mesmerizing play of the videos or the revolving sculptures. Quantum Circus I is a huge hodgepodge of distorted dictators, quotes, WWII battle maps, art historical images and chaotic, cause-and-effect lines - which exemplifies the show's dialogue on the rise and fall of empires - religious, artistic, historical or otherwise. Myriad references to anything from the Bible to quantum physics lead off on fascinating tangents. In bringing them together, Zansky and Stanislav attempt to show just how truly unusual the chimera of human experience can be. Once this exhibition has been entered, exiting proves a bit tough-it's a seductive environment, even though much of the imagery is repulsive.

 

Minneapolis Star Tribune, Friday, March 7, 2008
Author: Mary Abbe

read pdf

excerpts from the article:

The show is on view for just 10 more days, and it is spectacular, ranking among the most elegant and mesmerizing exhibits the museum has offered in many years. For all its recurrent obelisk motifs, "River" is not merely a paean to geometric form or ancient architecture, but a lush multidimensional environment that weaves together American Indian motifs, desert landscapes and subtle allusions to astrology, astronomy, ancient myths, national mythologies, apocalypse and such pop culture icons as My Little Pony and the films of Michelangelo Antonioni ("Zabriskie Point") and Francis Ford Coppola ("The Godfather").

 

Totally Dublin, March 2009
Author: Sheena Madden

read pdf

excerpts from the article:

So what is it about the paranormal and the supernatural that holds such fascination for so many of us? This is a question that Andrea Stanislav seeks to answer in many of her artistic endeavours, the latest of which is Fogrlogarburn, a two part multimedia installation being exhibited in Smithfield. The exhibition draws inspiration from Andrea's past installations and from the atmospherically numinous nature of Smithfield Market. Two of Andrea's previous interactive installations have been particularly stirring in her venture to erode the boundaries between subject and object. House of Red on White (2004) was a site specific installation within the confines of a bungalow located on the borders of an impoverished Alabama town. The house was transformed into a shrine of acknowledgement to the local ghosts of Alabama, through a succession of mirrors, mixed media sculptures; pictures and atmospheric soundbites that worked together to give the illusion of people moving through the rooms. The stories were used as a metaphor for the town's unsettled and racially charged history...
Fogtlogarburn is a spectacle event that explores the past, present and future ghosts of Smithfield Market. The multimedia installation will take place in two parts. Part one will make use of Smithfield Market itself by enveloping it in a mystic fog of pink smoke from which the 'ghosts' will emerge in a choreographed performance; a burning tiger, a trotting horse and a projection of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, which was shot in the marketin 1965. All the while, beams of piercing, crepuscular light will fracture the smoke which envelopes the market. Part two of the installation will be set up at thisisnotashop Gallery. The exhibition will see the video shoot of the Market event projected from the rear of the gallery and through the windows, making it observable to passers-by and passengers of the window's flanking Luas line, dynamically activating the public sphere once again. Within the confines of the gallery itself, multiple rows of clay figurines will garnish the shelves; the figurines will make tangible the characters from the market installation. Aligned with the figurines will be a series of photographs and sculptures representative of the ghosts of Smithfield Market.

 

Public Art Review, Issue 40, Spring/Summer 2009
Author: Jon Spayde

read pdf 


listen to audio: Minnesota Public Radio interview, January, 16, 2009
A&E Correspondent: Marianne Combs



read pdf

 
contact: andslav@gmail.com